HIS 501. History of Christianity. (3 h)

This course surveys the first through the 16th centuries. Attention is given to the early Councils, the rise of the papacy, dissenting movements, and the development of the sacraments. Medieval studies include mysticism, church/state affiliations, and scholasticism. Reformation issues survey the work of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin and the Radical Reformers.

HIS 502. History of Christianity II. (3 h)

This course surveys the 17th through the 20th centuries. Attention is given to the rise of modernism and its impact on philosophy, theology, ecclesiology and politics. Catholic studies focus on individuals such as Sor Juana de la Cruz, Teresa of Avila, Alfred Loisy, Pius IX, John XXII and Dorothy Day, and the impact of Liberation Theology. Protestant studies examine the rise of Puritanism, missionary movements, dissenters, global Christianity, slavery and civil rights, and religions in America.

HIS 511. Introduction to World Christianity. (3 h)

This course will include an introduction to the emerging field of World Christianity, which calls attention to the beliefs and practices of Christian communities in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Pacific. Together, we will explore some of the key themes currently at the forefront of the conversation within World Christianity, including conversion, secularization, reverse mission, interreligious dialogue, migration, diasporic Christianity, and the recent surge in charismatic and Pentecostal forms of Christianity. Throughout the semester, students will have the opportunity to learn from a diverse slate of scholars, with respect to gender, race and ethnicity, nationality, theological perspective, and academic discipline. The underlying goal of the course is for students to develop a deeper understanding of their respective ministerial callings in light of the global nature of the body of Christ.

HIS 583. Ecclesiastical Latin IV. (1-3 h)

HIS 591. Africian-American Religious History and Experience. (3 h)

An exploration of the religious dimensions of African-American life from its African antecedents to contemporary figures and movements.

HIS 594A. Egypt. (1 h)

This course provides an historical introduction to Egypt's Muslim society as the context within which minority Christian communities have practiced their faith. By traveling to the Arab Republic of Egypt, students will directly experience Muslim culture and religion as they investigate Egypt's rich religious heritage. The class will visit numerous pharaonic, Christian, Muslim, and (historically) Jewish places of worship in the greater Cairo area and in Egypt's stunning archeological sites at the southern environs of Luxor. We will witness the grandeur of Islamic civilization in Cairo's medieval mosques and modern monuments. We will discuss the tumultuous history of Jews in Egypt while touring Cairo's historic Ben Ezra Synagogue. We will examine Christian monasticism in the place of its origin at the Wadi Natrun. Site visits to numerous Christian churches, including All Saints Anglican Church (with its Sudanese refugee congregation), will expose students to a diversity of Christian practices in Egypt.

HIS 594B. Egypt. (2 h)

This course provides an historical introduction to Egypt's Muslim society as the context within which minority Christian communities have practiced their faith. By traveling to the Arab Republic of Egypt, students will directly experience Muslim culture and religion as they investigate Egypt's rich religious heritage. The class will visit numerous pharaonic, Christian, Muslim, and (historically) Jewish places of worship in the greater Cairo area and in Egypt's stunning archeological sites at the southern environs of Luxor. We will witness the grandeur of Islamic civilization in Cairo's medieval mosques and modern monuments. We will discuss the tumultuous history of Jews in Egypt while touring Cairo's historic Ben Ezra Synagogue. We will examine Christian monasticism in the place of its origin at the Wadi Natrun. Site visits to numerous Christian churches, including All Saints Anglican Church (with its Sudanese refugee congregation), will expose students to a diversity of Christian practices in Egypt.

HIS 598. O Jerusalem! Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Holy City. (3 h)

An introduction to the history and religious heritage of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities in Jerusalem and the Holy Land. Participants will metaphorically “walk the pilgrim’s road” as we trace the historic development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from their ancient origins, through the medieval period and Crusades, into the modern controversies around colonialism, Zionism, and contemporary politics. Special attention will be given to the city of Jerusalem through the ages; the spirituality of pilgrimage; Hasidism, Kabbalah, and modern ultra-Orthodox Judaism; the art and architecture of the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa mosque; the Via Dolorosa, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, and other pilgrimage sites on the Mount of Olives; Eastern Orthodox Christian communities; and diversity within each of the Abrahamic traditions (including Baha’i and Druze sects) in the Holy Land.

HIS 611. Early Christianity. (3 h)

A close reading of primary sources and a consideration of the art, architecture, and music as well as archeological evidence of the period.

HIS 630. Culinary Culture in Black Religious Experience. (1-3 h)

An exploration of the historical, social, cultural, theological, ethnographic, and practical components of African American religious life and foodway culture. Particular attention is given to the historical relationship between eating and church life, highlighting diverse and creative forms of culinary expression in the African American faith tradition and the ways in which food becomes transformative for those struggling for human dignity.

HIS 631. Hist of Medieval Christianity. (3 h)

A study of major themes and events in the medieval churches.

HIS 632. Spirituality of the Middle Ages. (3 h)

A close reading of primary sources and a consideration of the art, architecture, music, and other archeological evidence of the period.

HIS 648. Episcopal Studies II: The Book of Common Prayer. (3 h)

This course will study the history and evolution of The Book of Common Prayer as well as possible future developments. As the current trend has been to add liturgies instead of revise the Prayer Book, this course will also examine the rites authorized by General Convention supplements.

HIS 651. The Protestant and Catholic Reformations. (3 h)

A study of the origin and development of Reformation theology and ecclesiology.

HIS 652. Radical Christian Movements. (3 h)

A study of selected radical movements in the Christian tradition and their relation to contemporary issues.

HIS 659. Muslims in America, Muslims are America. (3 h)

One hundred and twenty miles to our southeast, the grave of Omar ibn Said is obscured by overgrown vines in Fayd-il (Fayetteville, NC). An Islamic scholar from Senegal, Said was enslaved and transported to the United States where he persevered in his commitments to both Islam and the increase of knowledge. We will explore his story and dozens more as we trace the history of Muslims in the United States from before the founding of the republic to present day. The third largest religion in the U.S. and among the most racially diverse, the course will provide us with the opportunity to examine a range of issues including religious freedom, religious persecution, race, racism, and immigration. Particular points of emphasis will include Muslim-Christian relations, the growth of African-American Muslim movements in the first half of the 20th century, the life of Malcolm X, the current challenges faced by Muslim immigrants and refugees, and the phenomena of "Taqwacore" (Muslim punk music) and "Muslim cool" at the intersection of hip hop and Islam as described by Su'ad Abdul Khabeer.

HIS 660. Islam and Interfaith Encounters in Morocco. (1.5-3 h)

Since 1994 the historic North African city of Fes, Morocco, has hosted the annual Festival of World Sacred Music. Musicians and dancers come from across the globe to perform and share in intercultural and interfaith conversations. The nine-day festival celebrates “the spiritual heart of Islam—peaceful, pluralistic, generous and cheerful—” as it honors the diverse spiritual traditions of the world. Each day of the festival features a morning forum, an intimate afternoon concert in the courtyard of the Batha Museum, an evening performance outside the medina’s medieval gate (Bab Al-Makina), and a late-night exhibition of Sufi chants and dancing (dhikr) from various Moroccan brotherhoods. Academic topics include Islam, Sufism, world sacred music, and Moroccan culture, history, and literature.

HIS 661. World Religions. (3 h)

An examination of the ideas and practices of major religious traditions in their historical and cultural contexts. The primary focus is on the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, the religions of China and Japan, and Islam.

HIS 663. Religions of Japan. (3 h)

A study of the central religious traditions of Japan from pre-history to the present, including Shinto, Buddhism, Zen Buddhism, Christianity and Confucianism.

HIS 664. Conceptions of the Afterlife. (3 h)

An examination of the variety of answers given to the question: "What happens after death?" Particular attention is given to the views of Jews, Christians, Muslims, Hindus, and Buddhists and the ways their views relate to life in this world.

HIS 665. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3 h)

An introduction to the most important traditions in Chinese philosophy and religion: Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism), and Chinese Buddhism or Chinese Chan (Zen) Buddhism.

HIS 667. Islam. (3 h)

An examination of the origins and development of Islam. Particular attention is given to the formation of Islamic faith and practice, as well as contemporary manifestations of Islam in Asia, Africa, and North America.

HIS 671. Religions in America. (3 h)

A study of religious traditions, events, and individuals shaping religious life in America. Attention is given to native religions, colonization, denominations, awakenings, religious liberty, the western movement and the rise of the American Self. The development of pluralism and the impact of immigration, civil rights, and new religions is studied.

HIS 672. Interfaith Dialogue. (1-3 h)

An exploration of the challenges and opportunities presented by the contemporary encounters between Christians and people of other religious communities.

HIS 673. Evangelicalism in North America. (3 h)

An examination of evangelicalism with regard to its important contributions to American religious culture, its variety in forms, and its ability to reconsider itself in an increasingly pluralistic United States.

HIS 674. Religion and the Civil Rights Struggle. (3 h)

Resistance to racial bias dates back to institutional slavery.  This course will chart an intellectual history from antebellum America through the most publicized protest movement during the mid-to- late twentieth century—the Civil Rights Movement. Students will assess several classic and contemporary texts on radical black political thought, connecting those historical voices to contemporary religious thinking and social activism. This course will consider the ways in which faith communities, organizations, and individuals have fueled or been reinforced by African American protests and demands for equal rights.  As a site of investigation, this class also will pay some attention to the history and nature of the civil rights struggle in Winston-Salem and surrounding areas. Ultimately, this class will engage the complexity of religious voices within the American freedom struggle—including Judaeo-Christians, Muslims, or even the non-religious.  We will trace the role religious faith plays in the various forms of the resistance over the nearly 400 years of the African American pilgrimage for equal rights.

HIS 681. American Denominationalism. (3 h)

A study of the development of denominationalism in America with particular attention to specific faith communities and the shape of religious organizations for the future.

HIS 682. A History of the Baptists. (3 h)

A study of Baptist history with particular attention to Baptists in the United States and the diversity of Baptist ways of belief and practice.

HIS 683. Anglican Theology and Historical Roots. (3 h)

This course will explore the core tenants of Anglican theology as they have developed historically. The class will begin with the work of Richard Hooker and theological reform of the Reformation. The next section will examine the development of Anglican theology in England and the United States with particular attention to social theology.

HIS 693. African-American Religious Traditions. (3 h)

A history of religious movements, communities, and individuals within African-American traditions.

HIS 731. Mysticism and the Church. (3 h)

A historical study of the nature of mysticism in varied Christian expressions.

HIS 735. Lit Classics World Religions. (3 h)

This course examines great works of literature from the world’s religious traditions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. While the basic teachings of selected religions are introduced for students with little or no background in the subject, the focus of this class remains on scriptural and literary texts that offer classic theological perspectives on the human condition. These are beautiful and profound writings, ranging from the tragic to the sublime, that challenge readers with perennial questions of religious significance. Our subjects and readings may encompass philosophical discourses, prophetic oracles, lyric and mystical poetry, lamentation and tragic narrative, erotic imagery, and apocalyptic visions of cosmic destruction. Readings include the Gilgamesh Epic, biblical texts, the Qur’an, Sufi poetry, Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Dhammapada, and Zen sutras.

HIS 761. Rabbinic Judaism. (3 h)

This course discusses the origins, development, and systems of rabbinic Judaism from circa first century CE to the early Middle Ages, including introduction to classic texts and genres such as Mishnah, Talmud, midrash, early ethical literature, and codes of Jewish law.

HIS 762. Contemporary Judaism. (3 h)

A study of the structure of modern Jewish worship, religious living, and thought; particular consideration to the impact of the Shoah, modern Israel, feminism, and interreligious relations.

HIS 771. Religious Experience in America. (3 h)

An examination of the nature of conversion, mysticism, and other forms of religious experience in American religious life.

HIS 790. Topics. (1-4 h)

Courses in history can be developed and offered on a one-time basis using this designation.

HIS 790A. Tpcs Course in Historical Stud. (1-3 h)

HIS 790B. Tpcs Course in Historical Stud. (1-3 h)

HIS 790C. Tpcs Course in Historical Stud. (1-3 h)