BIB 501. Elementary Hebrew I. (3 h)

A course for beginners in the classical Hebrew of the Bible, with emphasis on the basic principles of grammar and the reading of biblical texts. Core requirement is met only after both semesters are completed.

BIB 502. Elementary Hebrew II. (3 h)

A course for beginners in the classical Hebrew of the Bible, with emphasis on the basic principles of grammar and the reading of biblical texts. Core requirement is met only after both semesters are completed.

BIB 503. Intermediate Hebrew. (3 h)

A course for beginners in the classical Hebrew of the Bible, with emphasis on the basic principles of grammar and the reading of biblical texts.

BIB 504. Advanced Hebrew. (3 h)

Permission of Instructor.

BIB 511. Intro to New Testament Greek I. (3 h)

A beginning course in koine Greek, covering the fundamentals of grammar, with extensive reading in New Testament texts. Core requirement is met only after both semesters are completed.

BIB 512. Intro to New Testament Grk II. (3 h)

A beginning course in Koine Greek covering the fundamentals of grammar with extensive reading in New Testament texts. Core requirement is met only after both semesters are completed.

BIB 521. Old Testament Interpretation I. (3 h)

An introduction to the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel. This course covers the Pentateuch and Former Prophets.

BIB 522. Old Testament Interpretation II. (3 h)

An introduction to the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel. This course covers the Latter Prophets and the Writings.

BIB 541. Introduction to New Testament. (3 h)

This course provides an overview of New Testament texts and contexts. Students will explore the content, historical context, literary structures, and theological perspectives of New Testament texts. In addition, students will learn some basic tools for biblical interpretation.

BIB 542. Interpreting New Testament Letters. (3 h)

This course focuses on the early Christian epistolary tradition, deepening students' knowledge of Pauline letters, catholic letters, and texts often associated with letter writers (e.g. Hebrews). Students will intensify their ability to use a variety of exegetical tools for New Testament interpretation and begin to explore different interpretive frameworks. Prerequisite: BIB 541.

BIB 543. Interpreting New Testament Gospels. (3 h)

This course focuses on the early Christian gospel tradition, deepening students' knowledge of canonical gospel texts (including Acts). Students will intensify their ability to use a variety of exegetical tools for New Testament interpretation and begin to explore different interpretive frameworks. Prerequisite: BIB 541.

BIB 611. Intermediate Readings in Koine Greek. (1-3 h)

Prerequisite: BIB 511 and 512 or equivalent.

BIB 612. Angels and Demons. (3 h)

An exploration of angelic and demonic figures in the biblical text and in the history of interpretation in Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions. This course will also consider the portrayal of angels (some fallen) in contemporary fiction, television, and film.

BIB 613. Interim Reading Classic Greek. (3 h)

Permission of Instructor.

BIB 615. Myth and Scripture: The Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Myth. (3 h)

This seminar explores biblical texts that depict the creation of the world, divine combat, and the abode of the dead within their ancient Near Eastern mythological contexts. We will study Genesis 1–11 and Babylonian creation myths (Enuma Elish, Atrahasis and others); the Ugaritic Baal Cycle and biblical traditions of God's defeat of the Dragon and Sea (e.g. Isaiah 51, Revelation 12); and descents to the Netherworld (Nergal and Ereshkigal, The Descent of Ishtar, Isis and Osiris, Isaiah 14, and others). Goddess traditions may receive special attention.

BIB 616. Myths of Creation. (3 h)

This course explores a variety of ancient and "primitive" mythological texts concerned with the origins of the cosmos, the gods, and humanity. Selections from Hindu, Buddhist, Native American, Babylonian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Greek, Persian, and Norse mythology are examined within their respective cultures as well as in a comparative context. Attention is given to various anthropological and psychological theories of myth and literary methods of myth analysis. We also explore Genesis 1-3 and the creative reinterpretation of the Biblical images of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. The course concludes with a consideration of the survival of myth in the postmodern world and the relationship of the mythological imagination to recent scientific explanations of universal origins and cosmology.

BIB 617. The Bible and Film. (3 h)

This course explores the different ways in which the Bible, theology, and film can be placed into mutually critical conversation. While some attention is given to how the Bible and its stories are depicted in film, the goal of the class is to construct enriching dialogues between specific biblical texts and recent films of various kinds. How can biblical texts provide new lenses for our viewing of films? In what ways can films enrich our understanding and interpretation of Scripture? How can films be used in congregational settings to deepen our theological reflection and engagement?.

BIB 618. Egypt and Babylon: Ancient Near Eastern Myth. (3 h)

An introduction to ancient Egyptian, Babylonian, and Canaanite myths and their relation to the biblical tradition. This course examines the ancient Near Eastern context within which Israelite religion and literature developed. Topics include myths of creation and destruction, prayers and incantations, gods and goddesses, wisdom literature, and fertility and funerary cults discovered in the archaeological remains of these early civilizations. Primary readings in the world's oldest literatures will include such texts as the Epic of Gilgamesh, Ishtar's Descent to the Netherworld, Isis and Osiris, the Book of the Dead, and the Baal Cycle.

BIB 619. Africa and the Bible. (3 h)

This seminar explores the significance of Africa and Africans within biblical literature, with a primary focus on ancient Egyptian history and literature. Topics include Egyptian myth, magic, and poetry; the history and stories of Joseph, Exodus, and the Holy Family in Egypt; and biblical characters such as Hagar, the Queen of Sheba, the Black Pharaohs, and the Ethiopian eunuch. We will also survey the history of Judaism and Orthodox Christianity in Egypt, Meroë, and Ethiopia (including Rastafarianism) before concluding with some contemporary (post-colonial) readings of the Bible in Africa.

BIB 625. The Major Prophets. (3 h)

A close reading (exegesis) of Jeremiah, Isaiah, or Ezekiel with traditional and contemporary methods. Topics will vary between the study of a single book and particular historical contexts (preexilic, exilic, and postexilic). P-BIB 522.

BIB 627. Proclaiming Judges: Tales of Sex and Violence. (3 h)

Many Hebrew Bible texts contain disturbing images and stories related to sex, gender, and violence. Examples include Deborah and Jael, Jephthah’s daughter, the Samson narrative, the rape of the unnamed Levite’s concubine, and Ruth’s apparent seduction of Boaz. This course will examine in detail these stories and others as they appear in the books of Judges and Ruth. As a MIN offering in the Proclamation area, the course will move from exegesis and ancient literature to look at how Christian communities have dealt with, and should continue to deal with, these difficult and impious texts in preaching, liturgy, and religious education. The course will include analysis of how these texts have been presented in modern film, books, and music and in some Christian children’s resources, such as Veggie Tales.

BIB 629. Genesis: Creation and Covenant. (3 h)

A close reading (exegesis) of the book of Genesis with traditional and contemporary methods. P-BIB 521.

BIB 630. Daniel: Stories and Visions. (3 h)

A close reading (exegesis) of the book of Daniel with traditional and contemporary methods. P-BIB 522.

BIB 631. The Five Scrolls of the Jewish Festivals. (3 h)

A literary and theological study of Esther, Ruth, Lamentations, Song of Songs, and Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes) as canonical books and as festival readings in the Jewish liturgical year.

BIB 633. The Book of Psalms: Poetry and Spirituality. (3 h)

An examination of the development, literary characteristics, and theological contents of the works of ancient Israel's sages and poets.

BIB 642. Women and Slaves in the New Testament. (3 h)

This course explores the role of marginalized persons, particularly women, enslaved people, and impoverished people in the texts and contexts of the New Testament. Students will explore intersectional historical, literary, and theological frameworks for better understanding New Testament interpretation for and with contemporary faith communities.

BIB 645. The Gospel of John. (3 h)

A study of the Johannine community and writings, with attention to both socio-historical and theological dimensions of the texts. P-BIB 541.

BIB 651. Reading Our Common Scriptures: Jewish-Christian Dialogue. (3 h)

BIB 661. Feminist Interpretations of the Bible. (3 h)

An exploration of feminist hermeneutics for the reading of biblical texts.

BIB 666. The Book of Revelation. (3 h)

From visions of heavenly worship to visions of renewed creation, from fantasmic monsters to epic battles, the book of Revelation remains one of the most enigmatic texts in our scriptural canon. In the first half of this course, students will explore the historical context, including contemporaneous apocalyptic literature, archaeological materials, and early Christian uses of the Revelation of John. The second half of the course will turn to an examination of modern interpretations of Revelation found in popular literature (e.g. Left Behind series), political discourses, and contemporary Christianity. We will focus on how these interpretations manifest theologically and ethically in the life of the church. P-BIB 541.

BIB 669. Gender and Family in Early Christianity. (3 h)

Examines how early Christians variously construed masculinity and femininity, as well as sexuality and the body, and how they configured social institutions, such as family, household, and church in relation to gender. Focuses on texts from the first three centuries, including portions of the New Testament, extra-canonical Christian works, and some non-Christian Greco-Roman texts.

BIB 701. Readings in Hebrew. (1-3 h)

Directed study for those who have completed the required courses and one intermediate course in Biblical Hebrew. Permission of Instructor.

BIB 711. Advanced Readings in Greek. (1-3 h)

An opportunity to read early Christian texts in Greek at an intermediate level for one to three hours a week. Readings and meeting times are decided by students and the instructor.

BIB 726. Special Studies in Early Christianity. (3 h)

Topical studies in early Christian history and literature, both canonical and non-canonical. One topic will be studied each time the course is offered. Examples include: Gender in Early Christianity; Early Christians and Their Scriptures; Early Christian Asceticism. Also listed as HIS 732. P-BIB 542.

BIB 741. Jesus in History, Literature, and Culture. (3 h)

A study of the post-Enlightenment quest for the historical Jesus, placing this quest into conversation with contemporary depictions of Jesus in film and other media. P-BIB 541.

BIB 790. Topics in Biblical Studies. (1-3 h)

Courses in biblical studies can be developed and offered on a one-time basis using this designation.

BIB 790A. Topics in Biblical Studies. (1-3 h)

BIB 790B. Topics in Biblical Studies. (1-3 h)

BIB 790C. Topics in Biblical Studies. (1-3 h)