ACP 101. Preparing for Academic Quiz Competition. (1 h)

Prepares students for academic quiz competition (quiz bowl) via the study of academic material in history, science, literature, mythology, philosophy, religion, social sciences, fine arts, geography, current events and other fields; via writing questions for academic competition tournaments; and via on-campus competition. Pass/Fail only. May be taken three times for credit. P-POI.

FYE 101. The College Transition. (1 h)

Exploration of issues related to academic success, living in community, and wellbeing in the transition to college. Emphasizes principles, understanding, and skills to promote a successful college transition. Pass/fail only. First-year students only.

FYS 100. First Year Seminar. (3 h)

First year seminars are a basic requirement for graduation and are designed to enhance each student's academic and social integration into Wake Forest. They foster intellectual interchange, both written and oral, and encourage examination of opposing viewpoints through reading, writing, and debate of issues in a small group setting. Seminars are offered in most academic departments and programs.

LIB 100. Academic Research and Information Issues. (1.5 h)

An introduction to the research process and methods for finding, retrieving and evaluating information in an academic library and through online sources. Encourages the development of the skills, attitudes and abilities essential to the discovery of information and promotes an understanding of how scholarship is produced., valued, and shared. Explores the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.

LIB 210. Social Sciences Research Sources and Strategies. (1.5 h)

This half-semester course helps students develop as emerging social science scholars. Through exploring the sources and strategies used in social science research, students will explore interdisciplinarity; design an effective research process; investigate and critically evaluate sources; develop proficiency in APA style and citation management software; participate in scholarly conversations; and reflect on issues around information production, access, and authority. Must be sophomore or above to enroll.

LIB 220. Science Research Sources and Strategies. (1.5 h)

This half-semester course provides students with an understanding of the sources and strategies for doing research in the natural sciences as well as the ethical, legal, and socioeconomic factors that influence scientific information production and dissemination. P—Major or minor in science discipline or POI.

LIB 230. Business and Accounting Research Sources and Strategies. (1.5 h)

Provides students with an understanding of the sources and strategies necessary for doing research in business and accounting. Topics include strategies for developing research projects, resources available in each discipline, finding and evaluating sources and interpreting research results. P-Major in business or accounting. P-Major in business or accounting or POI.

LIB 235. Research Methods for Entrepreneurs. (1.5 h)

This course is intended for students pursuing a minor in entrepreneurship or starting their own entrepreneurial project. It will introduce them to research methods and resources appropriate for business planning, including subscription-based resources available through WFU as well as reliable free resources available from governments, public libraries and elsewhere. The class will learn how to assess a potential market during the exploratory phase all the way through evaluating competitors and industry trends for more fully-formed business concepts. Trends in information gathering and information use by entrepreneurs will also be discussed.

LIB 240. History, Politics and Legal Research Sources and Strategies. (1.5 h)

Provides students with an understanding of the sources and strategies necessary for doing research in history, political science and law. Topics include strategies for developing research projects, resources available in each discipline, finding and evaluating sources and interpreting research results. Must be sophomore or above to enroll.

LIB 250. Humanities Research Sources and Strategies. (1.5 h)

Provides students with an understanding of the sources and strategies necessary for doing research in the humanities (English, classics, humanities, religion, history, philosophy, foreign language, art, music, theatre, dance). Topics include strategies for developing research projects, resources available in each discipline, finding and evaluating sources and interpreting research results. Must be sophomore or above to enroll.

LIB 260. History of the Book 1500-2000. (1.5 h)

Introduces students to issues in the history of the book in the West, from early modern manuscript culture through the beginnings of the digital age. Using materials from ZSR Library’s Rare Books Collection, students examine printed texts as objects of study in three major ways: as material artifacts, as vehicles for text, and as social constructs. Class assignments include a descriptive bibliography/research paper, in addition to hands-on typesetting, printing, and bookbinding projects. For more information contact the Special Collections Librarian, ZSR Library.

LIB 290. Topics in Information. (1-3 h)

Intensive look at one or more current topics in information. Course may be retaken for credit if topic varies.

SPM 201. Basic Athletic Training. (3 h)

A study of the basic knowledge and skills in the prevention, treatment, and care of common athletic injuries.

SPM 302. Advanced Athletic Training. (3 h)

WDC 100. Internship. (5-12 h)

A one-semester (6h) or 10 1/2 week summer (5h) internship in a business/government/non-government organization/nonprofit organization matching the individual student's interests. WAshington, D.C. area only; in collaboration with the Washington Center. Pass/Fail only.